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AN AMERICAN IN AMERICA PART II

(Or Reflections from Washington, Washington)

Last weekend I spent a day in Seattle, Washington. This marked the first time I’ve visited downtown Seattle since I arrived in Vancouver (yikes! I thought I would visit the US more). Our group travelled south to watch a baseball game as an early farewell celebration for an amazing labmate (come back and visit O!). Somewhat sadly, the home team lost to the Texas Rangers, but it was still an entertaining, sunshine-filled afternoon. After the game, we meandered through the Pike Place Market and I enjoyed a summer smoothie and gyro (not typical Seattle fare, although we did play count-the-Starbucks on the way back).

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In many ways, it was the quintessential American Sunday afternoon—baseball game, players in blue and white, and a rendition of “God Bless America” during the seventh inning stretch. We even listened to a podcast on American history and politics as we travelled to the stadium.

Recently, a historical microbiome moment occurred in Washington DC. In case you haven’t heard, President Barack Obama unveiled the National Microbiome Initiative (NMI). Check out the White House Announcement here (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/documents/OSTP%20National%20Microbiome%20Initiative%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf). The NMI follows a nationwide call to action for microbiome research issued earlier this year. In 2016/7, US Federal agencies will invest $121 million dollars in interdisciplinary, multi-ecosystem microbiome studies. Moreover, the NMI announcement also included some serious microbiome funding from academia, industry, and private sectors, including…

(1) $12 million for the Center for Microbiome Innovation (UC San Diego)

(2) A public microbiome data bank from One Codex

(3) $100 million from the Bill and Melissa Gates Foundation

While hundreds of millions of governmental dollars have already been invested in microbiome research (think the 2007 Human Microbiome Project, NIH-funded and NSF-funded research), the NMI highlights both the continued importance and interest of microbiome research. Proposed projects range from examining oceanic microbes to the study of extraterrestrial microbes in the solar system, human microbiome research and examination of plant-microbe interactions, development of computational tools and fostering of public knowledge. The future is bright with research possibilities. Let’s explore!

PS: Thanks A for transport and E for planning!

By KCBauer

Hello! My name is KCBauer and I am a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia. I am a researcher, writer, musician, and explorer. Originally from Washington DC, I graduated with a BA in Music and BS in Biology in 2014. This blog focuses on the gut microbiota, the trillions of microorganisms that reside along the digestive tract. My grad research at UBC examines the role of the gut microbiota on human health, brain development, and anthropology. When I am not in the lab, I enjoy ambling through Vancity, listening to music, reading science journals, and hiking. If you have questions, ideas for blog topics, suggestions for place to visit in BC, or corrections send me an email at KCBauer@msl.ubc.ca.

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